Ann Luke from Gunnedah Pet Vet is urging locals to be aware of snakes this summer

HERE TO HELP: Ann Luke from Pet Vet is warning locals about the danger snakes bring to their pets following a recent snake bite incident in Gunnedah.

HERE TO HELP: Ann Luke from Pet Vet is warning locals about the danger snakes bring to their pets following a recent snake bite incident in Gunnedah.

With warmer weather following recent rain, snake season is officially underway in Gunnedah.

New South Wales is home to some of the most deadly snakes in the country and Gunnedah Pet Vet’s Ann Luke said everyone needs to be aware of the threat of snakes.

“Snakes usually come into the human environment for food or water,” Ms Luke said.

“We usually see most snakes at the beginning and the end of the season, if they have enough water and food they are less likely to come near humans.”

The warning follows a snake bite case brought to Ms Luke on October 16, where a dog was bitten by a Mulga snake more commonly known as a 'king brown snake'.

“The case that I had last week was near the middle of town which is a bit concerning,” she said.

Ms Luke was able to treat the dog with antivenom and gave advice to pet owner’s when responding to snake bites.

“Stay calm, keep the animal still if you can and call us in advance of coming in.

“If you are able to kill the snake, bring it along to help with identification.

“Also it is important to make a decision on whether you have the funds for the treatment, because that can be a very hard decision,” she said. 

Ms Luke also said there are many things pet owners can do to minimise the risk of snake bites.

“Mostly they come for water and prey,” she said.

“So if you can limit the amount of saucers of water left around the house and rodents around things like chook pens for example that should help to limit snakes.”