Poll indicates Gunnedah residents more worried diesel than cigarettes

A submission to Gunnedah council on the negative effects of diesel fumes in Conadilly St has raised similar sentiment among the Namoi Valley Independent readership.

The public submission was in response to council’s draft smoke-free environment policy which was open to comment during its month-long exhibition.

We asked followers of NVI’s social media pages what they thought about concerns raised in the submission. The majority considered diesel just as bad as cigarette smoke which council intends to ban throughout much of Conadilly St.

In an online poll we asked: “Are you more concerned about the health affects of cigarette smoke or diesel fumes in Gunnedah's main street?”

Seventy-three per cent answered diesel and just 27 per cent said cigarettes.

One reader held serious concerns about diesel and its ill-effects on their health but conceded there was little hope of restricting its use.

“The diesel comes right into my car and I start coughing same with the smoke,” they posted. “I would like to see no more diesel being used, I know this will never happen in my life time.”

Another was also worried about idling petrol-fuelled vehicles.

“Often you see them left running in the main st in high summer and deep winter. They all bring tears of discomfort to my eyes. Also cause breathing difficulties to me,” the post read.

Others thought the diesel dilemma should be tackled once the cigarette smoke-free zone had been implemented.

“Let's get rid of the cigarettes first and then deal with the other problems!,” they said.

Gunnedah council’s April business paper recommended the smoke-free zone be approved.

“With consideration to the community consultation undertaken and the submissions received, it is recommended council adopt the draft smoke-free... policy.”

The notice of motion to adopt the policy was passed at council’s ordinary meeting on Wednesday evening.

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